Aerospace

Coming Soon - High-Speed Data Transmission in Military Aircraft: System Lifeline or Costly Afterthought?

The military aerospace industry is moving away from proprietary offerings to solutions with standardized protocols using open-source architectures. As a result, system architects and engineers are now focused on delivering solutions that do more than just reduce weight and save costs.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars, Aerospace
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The Newest Way to Propel Nanosatellites? Water.

Although maneuvering nanosatellites in space is a complex procedure, a new micro-propulsion method features the simplest of ingredients: water.

Posted in: News, Aerospace, Power Transmission, Propulsion
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Lindley Johnson, Planetary Defense Officer, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D. C.

NASA’s Planetary Defense Coordination Office (PDCO), managed at NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C., is responsible for early detection of potentially hazardous objects, like asteroids and comets, and issuing warnings about their potential impacts. This requires teamwork from observatories around the world. NASA’s Planetary Defense Officer, Lindley Johnson leads the global effort to detect and follow near-earth objects

Posted in: Who's Who, Aerospace, Data Acquisition, Imaging
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Calibration and Synchronization of Micro-Air-Vehicle Autopilots

Conventional calibration of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) through open-loop data collection includes typical flight simulator systems that provide processed stimuli to emulate real-life flight conditions. Other solutions involve testing inertial measurement devices on a multi-axis rate table using a processor internal to the inertial measurement devices, and transferring the signals directly to the processors for determining and storing the calibration coefficients of the inertial measurement devices internally so that they are self-calibrating. Unfortunately, conventional solutions typically involve evaluating control algorithms in a computer simulation before experimentation in the aircraft occurs. This can result in unstable flight during the first few cycles that could lead to failure of the aircraft.

Posted in: Briefs, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Calibration, Computer simulation, Automatic pilots, Automatic pilots, Test procedures, Aircraft
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Aircraft Landing Noise Reduction Liners

The liners reduce aircraft noise that occurs during landing, helping aircraft comply with increasingly stringent airport noise restrictions.

NASA Langley Research Center has developed two new implementations of acoustic liners for aircraft noise reduction whereby curved channels within tight spaces can be outfitted to provide noise reduction. The two implementations are flap side edge liners and landing gear door liners for airframe noise reduction. In these applications, the acoustic liner is designed primarily to reduce aircraft noise that occurs during landing, which will help aircraft comply with increasingly stringent airport noise restrictions.

Posted in: Briefs, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Airframes, Noise, Noise, Entry, descent, and landing
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Stop-Rotor Rotary Wing Aircraft

This aircraft eliminates the need for long runways or other large launch and recovery systems.

Some unmanned aircraft designs attempt to combine the vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) and hover capabilities of a helicopter with the increased speed and range capabilities of fixed-wing airplanes. Stop-rotor “nose-sitter” configurations — so named because the aircraft takes off and lands from a nose-down orientation — may offer good hover efficiency and aerodynamic design, but can require complex mechanical systems. These designs can also suffer a significant loss in altitude during transition from helicopter to airplane mode, and involve uneven weight distributions, rendering the aircraft “top heavy” and unwieldy during takeoff and landing. Further, the counter-rotating fuselage and tail of some nose-sitter designs are less practical than aircraft designs with a conventional fuselage orientation and tail rotor. Tiltrotor configurations with tiltable rotating propellers also involve mechanically complex systems and decreased hover efficiency due to higher disk loading. “Tail-sitter” designs — so named because the aircraft takes off and lands from a tail-down orientation — are associated with poor hover efficiency due to high disk loading and an awkward 90-degree attitude change between hover and forward flight modes.

Posted in: Briefs, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Propellers and rotors, Vehicle styling, Entry, descent, and landing, Rotary-wing aircraft, Unmanned aerial vehicles
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External Aircraft Noise Reduction Liners

This technology strategically places acoustic liners on the external surface of the aircraft to reduce such engine noise.

NASA Langley Research Center, in collaboration with Boeing and Lockheed Martin, has developed a new external acoustic liner for aircraft noise reduction. While the acoustic liner can be placed on any external aircraft surface, one attractive application is for open-rotor noise reduction. Airframe manufacturers are considering open rotor engines for future aircraft designs as they provide significant fuel savings. However, open rotor engines have no nacelle and thus, do not allow the use of conventional nacelle liners for noise abatement. This technology strategically places acoustic liners on the external surface of the aircraft to reduce such engine noise.

Posted in: Briefs, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Propellers and rotors, Acoustics, Noise, Acoustics, Noise, Aircraft
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In-flight Global Nonlinear Aerodynamics Modeling and Simulation

Potential applications include aircraft, spacecraft, watercraft, and self-driving cars and trucks.

NASA's Langley Research Center has developed an in-flight global nonlinear aerodynamics modeling and simulation system. The technology replaces the normal labor-intensive iterative process of repeated flight tests and combining locally valid models with a single flight and automatically developed globally valid model. The technology is highly accurate and efficient for developing global aerodynamic and thrust models for aircraft.

Posted in: Briefs, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Simulation and modeling, Aerodynamics, Aircraft, Spacecraft
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Aircraft Deicing Decision Support Tool (DST)

Smooth and efficient operation of the National Airspace System depends on timely execution of flight-related events. Weather can severely disrupt the carefully planned flight schedules at a hub airport and impact travelers through out the country. In particular, a snowstorm may cause substantial perturbation in the departure of aircraft due to the need for deicing prior to takeoff. The additional time needed for an aircraft to be deiced, including time in queue, is highly nonlinear and difficult to predict.

Posted in: Briefs, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Computer software / hardware, Computer software and hardware, Computer software / hardware, Computer software and hardware, Aircraft deicing, Air transportation facilities
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Center/TRACON Automation System Software Suite

The FAA has expressed great interest in early field tests and usage demonstrating reduced delays and operational errors.

Air traffic control within the US is getting more complicated as the number of aircraft increases. There is a great need to increase the efficiency of the system so that flight delays are minimized without having to build new airports or runways. At the same time, safety must be maintained so that increased traffic levels do not lead to air traffic control-related incidents.

Posted in: Briefs, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Computer software / hardware, Computer software and hardware, Computer software / hardware, Computer software and hardware, Automation, Air traffic control
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